Sunday, 8 July 2012

QUOTABLE QUOTES




Do you remember this section in the Readers Digest magazine? I came across the following quote this morning and thought to start a thread for our favourites.

This thread has been moved from Bookchat (15 June).

127 comments:

  1. “Open a book this minute and start reading. Don’t move until you’ve reached page fifty. Until you’ve buried your thoughts in print. Cover yourself with words. Wash yourself away. Dissolve.”
    ― Carol Shields, The Republic of Love

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  2. "There are no faster or firmer friends than those formed between people who love the same books." - Irving Stone (b. 14 July 1903)

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    1. I just love this quote! We might adopt it as our motto. What do you think?

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    2. I would say YES! I like them both very much, very apt.

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    3. We now have a new motto! Thanks, Sylvia

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  3. "If they give you ruled paper, write the other way." - Spanish poet, Juan Ramon Jimenez. (from 'The Lovely Bones' - Alice Sebold)

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  4. “Ben wished the world was organized by the Dewey decimal system. That way you'd be able to find whatever you were looking for.”
    ― Brian Selznick, Wonderstruck

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  5. “The true alchemists do not change lead into gold; they change the world into words.”

    ― William H. Gass, A Temple of Texts

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  6. “Words can be like X-rays if you use them properly -- they’ll go through anything. You read and you’re pierced.”
    ― Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

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  7. “You think your pain and your heartbreak are unprecedented in the history of the world, but then you read.”
    ― James Baldwin

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    1. Since posting this quote, I've been thinking about Baldwin, in particular, my favourite of his books, GIOVANNI'S ROOM. Has anyone read it? It was very controversial in 1956 and even now is quite confronting. It's about betrayal and set in the sleazier side of Paris.

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  8. “There are three rules for writing a novel. Unfortunately, no one knows what they are.”

    ― W. Somerset Maugham

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    1. A beginning, a middle and an end??

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  9. "Information is endlessly to be found, where shall we find wisdom?"
    - Harold Bloom

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  10. "There is no remedy for death--or birth--except to hug the spaces in between. Live loud. Live wide. Live tall."
    - Jim Crace

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  11. “There are two motives for reading a book; one, that you enjoy it; the other, that you can boast about it [on BookwormLive].”
    - Bertrand Russell

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  12. "This is why we read literature. Reality seems more bearable - more human - when it is described by an author such as……….." - David Free
    [Who? It doesn't matter. There is a long list of authors who fit the bill. Add your favourite.]

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  13. "If my doctor told me I had only six minutes to live, I wouldn't brood. I'd type a little faster." ~Isaac Asimov

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  14. “If you would tell me the heart of a man, tell me not what he reads, but what he rereads.”
    ― François Mauriac

    (Particularly apt in light of our first 'Question Time', don't you think?)

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  15. "A library is a hospital for the mind" - Anonymous

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  16. “I would hurl words into this darkness and wait for an echo, and if an echo sounded, no matter how faintly, I would send other words to tell, to march, to fight, to create a sense of the hunger for life that gnaws in us all.”
    ― Richard Wright, Black Boy

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  17. “People say that life is the thing, but I prefer reading.”
    ― Logan Pearsall Smith

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  18. “Some books should be tasted, some devoured, but only a few should be chewed and digested thoroughly.”
    ― Cornelia Funke, Inkheart

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  19. "I have never known any distress that an hour's reading did not relieve." ~Baron de Montesquieu

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  20. "Some men see things as they are and say why - I dream things that never were and say why not" - George Bernard Shaw

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  21. “A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies, said Jojen. The man who never reads lives only one.”
    ― George R.R. Martin, A Dance With Dragons

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  22. “Books are a uniquely portable magic.”
    ― Stephen King, On Writing

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  23. I can never read all the books I want;
    I can never be all the people I want and live all the lives I want.
    I can never train myself in all the skills I want.
    And why do I want?
    I want to live and feel all the shades, tones and variations of
    mental and physical experience possible in life.
    And I am horribly limited.
    Sylvia Plath

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  24. A library is a hospital for the mind - Anonymous

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  25. “The unfed mind devours itself.”
    ― Gore Vidal

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  26. “Reading one book is like eating one potato chip.”
    ― Diane Duane, So You Want to Be a Wizard

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  27. “Common sense in an uncommon degree is what the world calls wisdom.”
    ― Samuel Taylor Coleridge.

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  28. “What a blessing it is to love books as I love them;- to be able to converse with the dead, and to live amidst the unreal!”
    ― Thomas Babington Macaulay

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  29. Tolkien Responds to Questions of Race from Nazi Germany

    John Ronald Reuel Tolkien wrote The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, and The Silmarillion. In 1938, Tolkien was planning to release The Hobbit in Germany. The publishers first wanted to discern if he was of Aryan descent. This was his response.

    "if I am to understand that you are enquiring whether I am of Jewish origin, I can only reply that I regret that I appear to have no ancestors of that gifted people. My great-great-grandfather came to England in the eighteenth century from Germany: the main part of my descent is therefore purely English, and I am an English subject, which should be sufficient. I have been accustomed, nonetheless, to regard my German name with pride, and continued to do so throughout the period of the late regrettable war, in which I served in the English army. I cannot, however, forbear to comment that if impertinent and irrelevant inquiries of this sort are to become the rule in matters of literature, then the time is not far distant when a German name will no longer be a source of pride." -Tolkien

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  30. "Open the book to page ninety-nine and quality of the whole will be revealed to you." Ford Maddox Ford

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  31. Write what you know. That should leave you with a lot of free time.

    Howard Nemerov

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  32. Talent hits a target no one else can hit. Genius hits a target no one else can see.

    Arthur Schopenhauer

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  33. “The things I want to know are in books; my best friend is the man who'll get me a book I ain't read.”

    - Abraham Lincoln

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  34. “To read is to fly: it is to soar to a point of vantage which gives a view over wide terrains of history, human variety, ideas, shared experience and the fruits of many inquiries.”

    - A C Grayling, Financial Times (in a review of A History of Reading by Alberto Manguel)

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  35. “The greatest gift is a passion for reading.”

    - Elizabeth Hardwick

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  36. Whether you think you can, or you think you can't--you're right.

    Henry Ford

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  37. Give me a man or woman who has read a thousand books and you give me an interesting companion. Give me a man or woman who has read perhaps three and you give me a dangerous enemy indeed.”

    - Anne Rice, The Witching Hour

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  38. “When we read a story, we inhabit it. The covers of the book are like a roof and four walls. What is to happen next will take place within the four walls of the story. And this is possible because the story's voice makes everything its own.”

    - John Berger

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  39. “Everyone probably thinks that I'm a raving nymphomaniac, that I have an insatiable sexual appetite, when the truth is I'd rather read a book.”

    - Madonna (1991)

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  40. "My mother is far too clever to understand anything she doesn't like."

    Arnold Bennett (1867-1931)

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  41. Life is a shipwreck, but we must not forget to sing in the lifeboats.

    Voltaire

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  42. It is said that the shortest story ever told was written by the then young Ernest Hemingway, who said he could write a complete story in only six words!



    His colleagues disagreed, and each bet 10$ against the claim.



    Hemingway wrote down the words on a napkin
    and passed it around.



    Everyone agreed that he won the bet.



    Here is the shortest story ever told:

    For sale. Baby shoes. Never worn.

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  43. “The great objection to new books is that they prevent our reading old ones.”

    - Joseph Joubert

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  44. Grammar is a piano I play by ear.

    Joan Didion

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  45. Not one of your pertinent ancestors was squashed, devoured, drowned, starved, stranded, stuck fast, untimely wounded, or otherwise deflected from its life's quest of delivering a tiny charge of genetic material to the right partner at the right moment in order to perpetuate the only possible sequence of hereditary combinations that could result -- eventually, astoundingly, and all too briefly -- in you.

    Bill Bryson

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  46. Some day you will be old enough to start reading fairy tales again.

    C.S. Lewis

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  47. For books are not absolutely dead things, but do contain a potency of life in them to be as active as that soul was whose progeny they are; nay, they do preserve as in a vial the purest efficacy and extraction of that living intellect that bred them.
    John Milton

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  48. A book lying idle on a shelf is wasted ammunition.

    Henry Miller

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    1. There is a lot of wasted ammunition at my house !! :(

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  49. A little late but I found some Santa quotes. Hope you enjoy them,too.

    One of the problems we have in this world is that too many adults believe in Santa Claus, and too many children don’t.
    Lee Lauer

    A critic is a man who found out when he was about ten that there wasn’t any Santa Claus, and he’s still upset.
    James Gould Cozzens

    Santa Claus has the right idea: visit people once a year.
    Victor Borge

    I stopped believing in Santa Claus when I was six. Mother took me to see him in a department store and he asked for my autograph.
    Shirley Temple

    Christmas is a time when kids tell Santa what they want and adults pay for it. Deficits are when adults tell the government what they want and their kids pay for it.
    Richard Lamm

    Alas! How dreary would be the world if there was no Santa Claus! There would be no childlike faith then, no poetry, no romance to make tolerable this existence.
    Francis P. Church

    Santa Claus is anyone who loves another and seeks to make them happy; who gives himself by thought or word or deed in every gift that he bestows.
    Edwin Osgood Grover

    Let me see if I’ve got this Santa business straight. You say he wears a beard, has no discernible source of income and flies to cities all over the world under cover of darkness? You sure this guy isn’t laundering illegal drug money?
    Tom Armstrong

    There are three stages of a man’s life:
    He believes in Santa Claus.
    He doesn’t believe in Santa Claus
    He is Santa Claus.

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  50. I myself have never been able to find out precisely what feminism is: I only know that people call me a feminist whenever I express sentiments that differentiate me from a doormat.

    Rebecca West

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  51. Two possibilities exist: either we are alone in the Universe or we are not. Both are equally terrifying.

    Arthur C. Clarke

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    1. This is another of my favourites, although I attributed it to Carl Sagan.

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    2. We went to see "Quartet" yesterday - don't miss it, it is brilliant. A quote I've always liked was used by the Pauline Collins character - quoting Bette Davis - old age is not for sissies.

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    3. I saw it too, just yesterday. Wasn't it a great idea to show the 'then and now' in the credits?

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  52. It is sometimes an appropriate response to reality to go insane.

    Philip K. Dick

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  53. Tonight’s December thirty-first,
    Something is about to burst.
    The clock is crouching, dark and small,
    Like a time bomb in the hall.
    Hark, it's midnight, children dear.
    Duck! Here comes another year!

    Ogden Nash

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    1. Good old Ogden Nash - I used to regularly quote his "I eat my peas with honey, it may seem kinda funny, but it keeps them on the knife" to my sons when they turned their forks over to eat peas.

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  54. Sanity is a madness put to good uses.

    George Santayana

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  55. For last year's words belong to last year's language
    And next year's words await another voice.

    T.S. Eliot

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  56. All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.

    J.R.R. Tolkien

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  57. Books are not made to be believed, but to be subjected to inquiry. When we consider a book, we mustn't ask ourselves what it says but what it means...
    Umberto Eco

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  58. If the real world were a book, it would never find a publisher. Overlong, detailed to the point of distraction-and ultimately, without a major resolution.

    Jasper Fforde

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  59. A person who won't read has no advantage over one who can't.

    Mark Twain

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  60. He wrapped himself in quotations - as a beggar would enfold himself in the purple of Emperors.

    Rudyard Kipling

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  61. The books - the generous friends who met me without suspicion - the merciful masters who never used me ill!
    Wilkie Collins

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  62. This was another of our fears: that Life wouldn't turn out to be like Literature.

    Julian Barnes

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  63. Lock up your libraries if you like; but there is no gate, no lock, no bolt that you can set upon the freedom of my mind.
    Virginia Woolf

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  64. We are always the same age inside.

    Gertrude Stein

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    1. My mother told me that many years ago when I was too young to believe her!!

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    2. Can't beat a mother's wisdom! I'll bet your children didn't believe you either.

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  65. Impropriety is the soul of wit.

    W. Somerset Maugham

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  66. My library is an archive of longings.

    Susan Sontag

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  67. And then I asked him with my eyes to ask again yes and then he asked me would I yes and his heart was going like mad and yes I said yes I will yes.

    James Joyce

    February 14, 1921: Influential literary magazine The Little Review brought James Joyce’s Ulysses to America, but 92 years ago today, it was convicted for publishing “the work of a disordered mind.”

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    1. I clearly remember asking to read Ulysses in our local library when I was about 15 and had heard how "naughty" it was. They wouldn't let me take it out on loan and I had to sit and read it in the reference section! It was a complete disappointment at that age.

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    2. Wow! You were a precocious 15yo reader to even attempt 'Ulysses'! It's on my 'must read sometime' list. I read Lady Chatterly when I was quite young, for similar reasons and was so bored I've not attempted it again.

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    3. Well, that's funny, because my grandfather used to send me money vouchers from England for my birthdays and one year all my Yr 12 class were very keen to read Lady Chatterley as it had just been released from the ban so I secretly wrote to him and asked if he could buy it for me and post it out. The poor dear had no idea what it was, I intercepted the parcel at the gate as my mother worked at that stage and then I read it aloud in serial form to my classmates at lunchtime.

      They were pretty flabbergasted with the language but the rest seemed boring at the time. However, the interesting thing is that we happened to see The Trial of Lady Chatterley on TV recently so I downloaded ithe novel from Gutenberg and found it really interesting and much more to it than I remembered.

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    4. I've often thought about rereading it, now that I am old enough to appreciate it. I do like Lawrence but always pass over this one. I have Kangaroo on my shelf. That will probably be my next Lawrence.

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  68. “A peasant that reads is a prince in waiting.”

    ― Walter Mosley, The Long Fall

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  69. There is a lovely statue in the middle of Dublin, Ireland of an elderly James Joyce. The locals call it, affectionately, 'the prick with the stick'

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  70. Interesting - I've seen it, Moi, but didn't know about the name.

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  71. Do not go gentle into that good night.
    Rage, rage against the dying of the light.
    Dylan Thomas
    February 20, 1950: Welsh poet Dylan Thomas arrived in New York 63 years ago today, where he began an American speaking tour that cemented his reputation as a literary genius and epic imbiber.

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  72. He never went out without a book under his arm, and he often came back with two.

    Victor Hugo (1802-1885)

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  73. Everybody is identical in their secret unspoken belief that way deep down they are different from everyone else.

    David Foster Wallace

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  74. Wicked people never have time for reading. It's one of the reasons for their wickedness.

    Lemony Snicket

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  75. Books have a unique way of stopping time in a particular moment and saying: Let’s not forget this.

    Dave Eggers

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  76. Memories warm you up from the inside. But they also tear you apart.
    Haruki Murakami

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  77. But luxury has never appealed to me, I like simple things, books, being alone, or with somebody who understands.

    Daphne du Maurier

    March 13, 1907: British writer Daphne du Maurier was born 106 years ago today. Hitchcock's horror classic, The Birds, was based on her short story by the same name.

    Should we consider a du Maurier for our group read?

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  78. If a book is well written, I always find it too short.
    Jane Austen

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  79. All happiness depends on courage and work.
    Honoré de Balzac
    March 19, 1842: French writer Honoré de Balzac was always up for a get-rich-quick scheme. Hoping to drum up some buzz for his latest play, he spread a rumor that it was sold out. It opened 171 years ago today, to an empty theater.


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  80. "Learning history from film is a bit of a waste of time. Film is based on the average endurance of the human bladder."

    Tom Keneally

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  81. Books may well be the only true magic.

    Alice Hoffman

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  82. Good friends, good books, and a sleepy conscience: this is the ideal life.

    Mark Twain

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  83. Literature is news that stays news.

    Ezra Pound

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  84. I'm glad you like adverbs — I adore them; they are the only qualifications I really much respect.

    Henry James

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  85. They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old;
    Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
    At the going down of the sun and in the morning
    We will remember them.

    Laurence Binyon (1869–1943)

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  86. If I had my life to live over again, I would have made a rule to read some poetry and listen to some music at least once every week.

    Charles Darwin

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  87. “If one cannot enjoy reading a book over and over again, there is no use in reading it at all.”
    ― Oscar Wilde

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  88. The winds and waves are always on the side of the ablest navigators.

    Edward Gibbon

    (It's not exactly 'bookish', but I like it)

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  89. Some of these things are true and some of them lies. But they are all good stories.

    Hilary Mantel

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  90. The future is there...looking back at us. Trying to make sense of the fiction we will have become.

    William Gibson

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  91. “Books are the plane, and the train, and the road. They are the destination, and the journey. They are home.”

    ― Anna Quindlen, How Reading Changed My Life

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  92. It is most likely that I will die next to a pile of books I was meaning to read.

    Lemony Snicket

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  93. If books could have more, give more, be more, show more, they would still need readers who bring to them sound and smell and light and all the rest that can’t be in books.
    The book needs you.

    Gary Paulsen

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  94. “Books are the plane, and the train, and the road. They are the destination, and the journey. They are home.”

    ― Anna Quindlen, How Reading Changed My Life

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  95. His books were the closest thing he had to furniture and he lived in them the way other men live in easy chairs.

    Laura Hillenbrand

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  96. 'tsundoku' Japanese (noun)

    "The art of leaving a book unread after buying it, typically piled up together with such other unread books."

    -en.wiktionary.org

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  97. I read a book one day and my whole life was changed.

    Orhan Pamuk

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  98. You don't have anything
    if you don't have the stories.

    Leslie Marmon Silko

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  99. Drink today, and drown all sorrow;
    You shall perhaps not do it tomorrow;
    Best, while you have it, use your breath;
    There is no drinking after death.

    Ben Jonson

    Literary rogue Ben Jonson was most famous for his satirical plays and his influence on his contemporary, William Shakespeare. He was born June 11,1572.

    Not much has changed, has it?

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  100. A book is really like a lover. It arranges itself in your life in a way that is beautiful.

    Maurice Sendak

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  101. Quotation, n: The act of repeating erroneously the words of another.

    Ambrose Bierce

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  102. “What an astonishing
    thing a book is. It’s a flat
    object made from a tree
    with flexible parts on
    which are imprinted lots
    of funny dark squiggles.
    But one glance at it and
    you’re inside the mind of
    another person, maybe
    somebody dead for
    thousands of years.
    Across the millennia, an
    author is speaking clearly
    and silently inside your
    head, directly to you.
    Writing is perhaps the
    greatest of human
    inventions, binding
    together people who
    never knew each other,
    citizens of distant epochs.
    Books break the shackles
    of time. A book is proof
    that humans are capable
    of working magic.”
    -Carl Sagan

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  103. The present changes the past. Looking back you do not find what you left behind.

    Kiran Desai

    September 3, 1971: Happy 42nd birthday, Kiran Desai! The Indian author's second book, The Inheritance of Loss, took eight years to write and won the Man Booker Prize. (Loved it!)Her mother is celebrated novelist Anita Desai.

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  104. There ought to be a word for the sense of being bereft when you finish reading a book.

    Maureen McCarthy

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  105. "Second hand books are wild books, homeless books; they have come together in wild flocks of variegated feather, and have a charm which the domesticated volumes of the library lack."

    -Virginia Woolf

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  106. Reading a book is like re-writing it for yourself. You bring to a novel, anything you read, all your experience of the world. You bring your history and you read it in your own terms.
    -Angela Carter


    Pasted from <https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Book-Grocer/114366681946642?ref=profile

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